nadyne:

and it goes so slowly on

look me in the eye…

thank you, serendipity, for leading me to this just now

thank you, serendipity, for leading me to this just now

(via walruswidow)

“So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”
— The Great Gatsby (via rifflefiction)

Yes.

My grief is an ocean.

At first, I didn’t even know how to swim. Couldn’t see the shore. Was sure the wide sea would quickly overtake me, and swallow me whole.

I don’t know when I began to acclimate: to stop struggling against the current, and to swim with the waves until my feet finally found sand.

It’s been almost nine months. I know now that I’ll never leave this ocean, but I take some pride in the fact that I’ve begun to learn its rhythms.

High tide. Low tide. Days that are calm and peaceful…and nights when some faraway storm sends murky waves that crash angrily against the shore.

I work hard to stay afloat. But I can’t predict when I’ll be yanked below the surface by an undertow: scared and disoriented, kicking and clawing for one gasp of air.

It’s infrequent, these days, that I’m buoyed by the hope that anyone will find me here, much less join me. It’s a lonely place, which I hadn’t foreseen.

But I swim on. What else can I do? This ocean is my home…even if it was chance, not choice that put me here.

rosemary.

phisnomy:

Claude Monet’s “The Water Lilies” at Musee de l’Orangerie in Paris
Monet’s veritable artistic testament, these “large decorations” are the culmination of an entire life. Designed from 1914 until his death (1926), they are inspired by the “water garden” at the artist’s property in Giverny. As of 1886, Monet became more interested in representing his garden according to the rythm of light variations. The eight panels evoke the hours passing, from morning to the East to Sunset in the West.
Monet represents neither the horizon, nor the top or the bottom. The elements - water, air, sky, earth - become interwined in a composition without perpective, where the water lily folwers provide the rythm. The painter thus give “the illusion of an endless whole, of a horizonless and shoreless wave”.

Giverny. xo phisnomy:

Claude Monet’s “The Water Lilies” at Musee de l’Orangerie in Paris
Monet’s veritable artistic testament, these “large decorations” are the culmination of an entire life. Designed from 1914 until his death (1926), they are inspired by the “water garden” at the artist’s property in Giverny. As of 1886, Monet became more interested in representing his garden according to the rythm of light variations. The eight panels evoke the hours passing, from morning to the East to Sunset in the West.
Monet represents neither the horizon, nor the top or the bottom. The elements - water, air, sky, earth - become interwined in a composition without perpective, where the water lily folwers provide the rythm. The painter thus give “the illusion of an endless whole, of a horizonless and shoreless wave”.

Giverny. xo phisnomy:

Claude Monet’s “The Water Lilies” at Musee de l’Orangerie in Paris
Monet’s veritable artistic testament, these “large decorations” are the culmination of an entire life. Designed from 1914 until his death (1926), they are inspired by the “water garden” at the artist’s property in Giverny. As of 1886, Monet became more interested in representing his garden according to the rythm of light variations. The eight panels evoke the hours passing, from morning to the East to Sunset in the West.
Monet represents neither the horizon, nor the top or the bottom. The elements - water, air, sky, earth - become interwined in a composition without perpective, where the water lily folwers provide the rythm. The painter thus give “the illusion of an endless whole, of a horizonless and shoreless wave”.

Giverny. xo phisnomy:

Claude Monet’s “The Water Lilies” at Musee de l’Orangerie in Paris
Monet’s veritable artistic testament, these “large decorations” are the culmination of an entire life. Designed from 1914 until his death (1926), they are inspired by the “water garden” at the artist’s property in Giverny. As of 1886, Monet became more interested in representing his garden according to the rythm of light variations. The eight panels evoke the hours passing, from morning to the East to Sunset in the West.
Monet represents neither the horizon, nor the top or the bottom. The elements - water, air, sky, earth - become interwined in a composition without perpective, where the water lily folwers provide the rythm. The painter thus give “the illusion of an endless whole, of a horizonless and shoreless wave”.

Giverny. xo

phisnomy:

Claude Monet’s “The Water Lilies” at Musee de l’Orangerie in Paris

Monet’s veritable artistic testament, these “large decorations” are the culmination of an entire life. Designed from 1914 until his death (1926), they are inspired by the “water garden” at the artist’s property in Giverny. As of 1886, Monet became more interested in representing his garden according to the rythm of light variations. The eight panels evoke the hours passing, from morning to the East to Sunset in the West.

Monet represents neither the horizon, nor the top or the bottom. The elements - water, air, sky, earth - become interwined in a composition without perpective, where the water lily folwers provide the rythm. The painter thus give “the illusion of an endless whole, of a horizonless and shoreless wave”.

Giverny. xo

art-and-exhibitions:

Musée de l’Orangerie

Out of all the art museums and galleries that I visited in Paris, the Orangerie has the best exhibition space by far. Monet tableaus span across the walls while natural light comes in through the ceiling and illuminates the paintings. 

The visitor undertakes a truly impressionist experience. Just as Monet tried to capture a moment while light is constantly changing, the visitor views the works in a space that also changes due to light pouring in through the ceiling and hitting the tableaus with different effects. 

It is breathtaking.

l’orangerie.

huffingtonpost:

Happy Birthday 161st birthday Vincent van Gogh. See more of Van Gogh’s many portraits here. 

v.v.g. xo

huffingtonpost:

Happy Birthday 161st birthday Vincent van Gogh. See more of Van Gogh’s many portraits here. 

v.v.g. xo